Can i remove a nyc tree?

Under Title 18, Chapter 1, Section 18-129 of the New York City Administrative Code, it is illegal and punishable by law for citizens to remove, kill, or damage a street tree or park, whether intentionally or accidentally. Dead trees reported in streets, parks, playgrounds, or other public spaces will be inspected and, if appropriate, removed.

Can i remove a nyc tree?

Under Title 18, Chapter 1, Section 18-129 of the New York City Administrative Code, it is illegal and punishable by law for citizens to remove, kill, or damage a street tree or park, whether intentionally or accidentally. Dead trees reported in streets, parks, playgrounds, or other public spaces will be inspected and, if appropriate, removed. As part of NYC Parks's new tree risk management program, work is prioritized to address higher-risk conditions first. To report a dead tree, call 311 or use our tree service request system.

It's not illegal to remove trees without a permit, but the New York City Parks and Recreation Department has simplified the request for tree removal. If representatives of the Parks and Recreation Department find any tree that is growing on private property, that is, sick, dead, or obstructing the public, they must notify the owner. The landlord has a specific amount of time to correct the condition, depending on its severity. The landlord can ask the city to remove or oversee the removal of the stumps as long as it agrees, in writing, to pay for the services.

Use the map or address search below to find stumps that have recently been removed or are scheduled to be removed. Trees may seem especially rare and precious in New York, but unlike many suburbs, the city generally places no restrictions on the removal of trees by its residents. We'll know when permits are needed and how to obtain them, and we'll learn the best approach to removing your tree based on the specific challenges of your landscape. A tree removal form is available to all residents and can be accessed by visiting the Parks and Recreation Department website.

Parks does everything possible to preserve and protect trees under the public right of way until their health condition or condition justifies their removal. Parks don't remove healthy trees because of infrastructure conflicts with sewer lines or concrete sidewalks.