What's tree pruning?

Pruning helps protect against pests and diseases and promotes strong growth. It mainly consists of removing dead, sick and loose branches that prevent trees from blooming.

What's tree pruning?

Pruning helps protect against pests and diseases and promotes strong growth. It mainly consists of removing dead, sick and loose branches that prevent trees from blooming. We also remove any growth that interferes with other parts of the plant, such as branches that cross each other. Pruning is not just limited to tree maintenance.

The term is usually associated with the removal of unnecessary branches and sometimes even roots. These branches and roots may be dead and need to be cut off from the tree. Extendable pole saw with chain drive %26 Pruner (7'—16 ft) Travel approximately 18 inches down the bottom of the branch you are removing. This is the perfect spot for your first incision.

Cut approximately halfway through the branch. Since the goal is not to change the size or shape of the tree, the thinning must be constant throughout the tree. You only need to remove 10 to 20 percent of tree branches from the rim of the crown. Large trees benefit by removing the end parts of branches that are between 1 and 4 inches in diameter.

Small ornamental landscape trees and fruit trees can be thinned by removing smaller branches, between ¼ and ½ inch thick. You should prune the trees to thin the crown, so that the tree still looks completely unpruned. Occasionally, the most natural solution is to completely remove the tree and replace it with a species that is more suitable for the site. By eliminating the total area of the plant's leaves, the amount of nutrients sent to the roots and the overall growth of the tree are reduced.

When it comes to trees and shrubs, pruning is often associated with the removal of foreign branches and sometimes even roots, some of which may be dead and need to be cut. Remember that each cut has the potential to change the growth of the tree, so it's important to set a goal for why the tree will be pruned. Unlike forest trees, landscape trees need a higher level of care to maintain structural integrity and aesthetics. By pruning and pruning trees in specific ways, you can encourage fruiting and flowering, shape plants into specific shapes, and control plant size.

Most light and routine pruning to remove weak, dead, or diseased branches can be done any time of the year with little effect on the tree. However, if your garden contains tall trees and shrubs that require pruning from dangerous heights or near power lines and other hazards, hire a professional. Too much foliage can make trees too heavy and fall more easily in storms, while falling branches can damage a house or the plants below. The first two cuts take away the weight of the tree branch and the final cut is designed for the best growth of calluses.

Correct thinning opens the foliage of a tree, reduces the weight of the most important branches and helps maintain the natural shape of the tree. Intensive pruning of living tissue should be avoided right after the spring sprout, especially on weak trees. The timing and frequency of pruning and pruning vary depending on the season, in addition to the species of plants and trees. Although many gardeners would prefer to never deal with the mess of falling leaves, I like this moment as an opportunity to inspect the top of each tree.

THINNING: Thinning is the selective removal of branches to improve the structure of the tree and increase light penetration and air movement throughout the crown. If your goal is to increase flowering capacity, prune immediately after the flowering cycle of a tree or shrub. .